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Thread: Enlarged Liver

  1. #1

    Enlarged Liver

    I went to have my once every 3 yearly BUPA health assessment today.

    Everything went well except when prodding around my stomach area the doctor said my liver was palpable, and it shouldnít be, suggesting itís enlarged and probably fatty. That was a bit of a shock.

    Naturally the doctor then looked down at my questionnaire, to see my response to alcohol consumption. Iíve always had a relationship with alcohol since I was 16 (Iím 49 now), but always felt I was in control, and only doing it for the enjoyment, as I can easily take a good few days in the row away from it without the craving.

    But, last few years, my drinking at weekends, usually in front of the telly, has escalated somewhat and I can get through 3-3.5 bottles of wine (30-35 units) over a weekend, convincing myself that my abstinence mid week will sort me out. I wasnít drinking enough to have hangovers, but the first hour or two of the weekend mornings were definitely groggy.

    Not sure I was getting immense pleasure from drinking, but itíd turned into a weekend habit to celebrate the end of the working week. A bad habit at that, because I was taking all my units in repeated days of the weekend, so effectively binge drinking.

    Well Iíve had a bit of a kick up the arse, and am now planning to change my relationship with alcohol. Not giving alcohol up, but cutting back significantly.

    Interestingly, no signs, symptoms, aches or pains, and if it hadnít been for work sending me on these assessments, Iíd have never known, and would have probably carried on drinking as normal.

    Maybe mine is a cautionary tale if you are up at the 30-40 units a week, but think all is OK.

  2. #2
    Grand Master Velorum's Avatar
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    Mine pretty much returned to normal after 6 months of abstinence.

    That was 18 months ago and I havent touched a drop since.

    I feel great.

  3. #3
    Good on you for realising and changing your habits!

    Its too easy to neck a bottle or 2 of wine and not keep count of the units.

    You should really get a referral for some blood tests and imaging of your liver, not sure if ultrasound or CT / MRI is in vogue these days

    Ask BUPA to rec a specialist, failing that ask your GP to refer you to a local liver specialist

    Simon

  4. #4
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    Thank you for this, will have a consultancy myself soon & no doubt expect a similar shock.

    My consumption is, in embarrassed to say, higher than yours. I consume at least a bottle of wine a night, usually with a couple of G&Ts when I get in & sometimes a rum before bed. At weekends, Iím easily increasing the consumption by two for all sources of alcohol.

    I never feel groggy, never worse for wear. Thatís probably my biggest concern is that it doesnít affect me & unlike exercise Iím guessing my challenging behaviour toward my liver is not a longer term clever position to be in.

    Thanks for the shock.


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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by simon-c View Post
    Good on you for realising and changing your habits!

    Its too easy to neck a bottle or 2 of wine and not keep count of the units.

    You should really get a referral for some blood tests and imaging of your liver, not sure if ultrasound or CT / MRI is in vogue these days

    Ask BUPA to rec a specialist, failing that ask your GP to refer you to a local liver specialist

    Simon
    + 1
    Don't assume the worst.

  6. #6
    Master Chinnock's Avatar
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    I fear many of us are in the same boat if truth be told. A cautionary reminder indeed. Many thanks.

  7. #7
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    A brave post which seems to have made others think, which may in turn help inspire positive life style changes. It's easy to fall into bad habits but not always so easy to change them. Glad it was brought to your attention early and like the previous post says, don't assume the worst.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by noTAGlove View Post
    I went to have my once every 3 yearly BUPA health assessment today.

    Everything went well except when prodding around my stomach area the doctor said my liver was palpable, and it shouldnít be, suggesting itís enlarged and probably fatty. That was a bit of a shock.

    Naturally the doctor then looked down at my questionnaire, to see my response to alcohol consumption. Iíve always had a relationship with alcohol since I was 16 (Iím 49 now), but always felt I was in control, and only doing it for the enjoyment, as I can easily take a good few days in the row away from it without the craving.

    But, last few years, my drinking at weekends, usually in front of the telly, has escalated somewhat and I can get through 3-3.5 bottles of wine (30-35 units) over a weekend, convincing myself that my abstinence mid week will sort me out. I wasnít drinking enough to have hangovers, but the first hour or two of the weekend mornings were definitely groggy.

    Not sure I was getting immense pleasure from drinking, but itíd turned into a weekend habit to celebrate the end of the working week. A bad habit at that, because I was taking all my units in repeated days of the weekend, so effectively binge drinking.

    Well Iíve had a bit of a kick up the arse, and am now planning to change my relationship with alcohol. Not giving alcohol up, but cutting back significantly.

    Interestingly, no signs, symptoms, aches or pains, and if it hadnít been for work sending me on these assessments, Iíd have never known, and would have probably carried on drinking as normal.

    Maybe mine is a cautionary tale if you are up at the 30-40 units a week, but think all is OK.
    If you don't mind me asking do you exercise regularly and how is your diet.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by simon-c View Post
    Good on you for realising and changing your habits!

    Its too easy to neck a bottle or 2 of wine and not keep count of the units.

    You should really get a referral for some blood tests and imaging of your liver, not sure if ultrasound or CT / MRI is in vogue these days

    Ask BUPA to rec a specialist, failing that ask your GP to refer you to a local liver specialist

    Simon
    Well Iím only on day one of changing my habits, but it is a Friday night, and usually I like a good glass of wine, or 5!! Not tonight.

    As part of the health assessment they will do liver enzyme and all other routine blood tests.

    For something else entirely, I had an abdominal and chest CT scan around 18 months ago which I know included by liver, and all was normal back then. But that was 18 months ago. Iíll follow up with my GP in a couple of weeks as I have to see him about a repeat prescription I take anyway.

    I did ask the doctor if it could be anything more suspicious, and whereas she obviously couldnít say for certainty from an external examination, she said Iíd probably be a lot more unwell by now if that was the case.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Velorum View Post
    Mine pretty much returned to normal after 6 months of abstinence..
    How did you know yours was enlarged/fatty?

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Passenger View Post
    If you don't mind me asking do you exercise regularly and how is your diet.
    I cycle to work about 50% of the time (say average 40 miles a week) and my diet is fairly good in that I try to avoid fried and processed foods. My BMI is 26 so Iím a stone over my fighting weight.

  12. #12
    Master Gruntfuttock's Avatar
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    I once worked with an ex-alcoholic. He had the 'if you have one more drink it will kill you' advice from his doctor due to nearly killing his liver, so stopped altogether. I couldn't understand how anyone could drink so much without feeling crap and hungover all the time. Turns out he never suffered from hangovers, so there was nothing really stopping him from drinking himself unconscious most of the time. He was also married to an alcoholic!

  13. #13
    Craftsman davida's Avatar
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    I gave up drinking six years ago due to an extremely destructive relationship with alcohol that crept up on me over the years. I never considered myself an alcoholic but then addicts never do. Its only when the s**t hits the fan that you realise where things are going to end up.

    Im not suggesting you are an alcoholic by any means but a health scare can be the first wake up call. What you do with that information is what matters.

    Best of luck.

    Dave.
    Last edited by davida; 12th January 2018 at 21:53.

  14. #14
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    I am in the fortunate position that I turn into an utter cock with too many drinks inside me. I stick to a couple of bottles of cider a week. That way everyone is happy!

    It's very easy to get into the drinking culture. It can be hard to do anything socially where drink is not almost compulsory.

  15. #15
    As others have said good on you for looking to change your habits

    I had a health scare last summer. Rushed into hospital with a ruptured abdomen, on the operating table very quickly and opened up and stitched together. 3 months laid up, a good 6 months before I felt near normal

    I used to drink 3 bottles of wine a week maybe more and a brandy or so of an evening. I’m 46 and have always drunk a fair bit since my late teens

    Since the operation I’ve really watched my diet, given up meat, gave up alcohol and watched what I ate.

    Now treat myself to a couple of glasses of wine a week following a chat with the Dr and various tests and furthers scans

    I’m amazed at how better I feel, lost a load of weight, more alert, less mood swings to name a few benefits

    If you can do it, do it!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mj2k View Post
    Thank you for this, will have a consultancy...

    Thanks for the shock.
    No offence intended but it sounds like you might be an alcoholic

  17. #17
    Master MFB Scotland's Avatar
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    I probably drink too much but I am quite fit and run a lot. I decided to cut down as I traditionally had a couple of beers each night.

    I did not have a beer between last Sunday and yesterday and will take that forward throughout 2018.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schofie View Post
    No offence intended but it sounds like you might be an alcoholic
    He sounds to me like a man being very open about his consumption and realising it needs addressing. I'd leave it there personally.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by noTAGlove View Post
    the doctor said my liver was palpable, and it shouldnít be
    Actually, having done a bit of research on the tíintersphere, it is not unusual to be able to palpate the liver.

    When lying down and taking a big deep breath apparently this drops the edge of the liver down from the protective rib cage so the doctor can feel it.

    This is what the doctor did to me, but she obviously felt it was larger than normal.

    Not sure anyone needed that information!!

  20. #20
    Master MFB Scotland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noTAGlove View Post
    Actually, having done a bit of research on the tíintersphere, it is not unusual to be able to palpate the liver.

    When lying down and taking a big deep breath apparently this drops the edge of the liver down from the protective rib cage so the doctor can feel it.

    This is what the doctor did to me, but she obviously felt it was larger than normal.

    Not sure anyone needed that information!!
    Great thread and thanks for being so honest !

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by noTAGlove View Post
    I went to have my once every 3 yearly BUPA health assessment today.

    Everything went well except when prodding around my stomach area the doctor said my liver was palpable, and it shouldnít be, suggesting itís enlarged and probably fatty. That was a bit of a shock.

    Naturally the doctor then looked down at my questionnaire, to see my response to alcohol consumption. Iíve always had a relationship with alcohol since I was 16 (Iím 49 now), but always felt I was in control, and only doing it for the enjoyment, as I can easily take a good few days in the row away from it without the craving.

    But, last few years, my drinking at weekends, usually in front of the telly, has escalated somewhat and I can get through 3-3.5 bottles of wine (30-35 units) over a weekend, convincing myself that my abstinence mid week will sort me out. I wasnít drinking enough to have hangovers, but the first hour or two of the weekend mornings were definitely groggy.

    Not sure I was getting immense pleasure from drinking, but itíd turned into a weekend habit to celebrate the end of the working week. A bad habit at that, because I was taking all my units in repeated days of the weekend, so effectively binge drinking.

    Well Iíve had a bit of a kick up the arse, and am now planning to change my relationship with alcohol. Not giving alcohol up, but cutting back significantly.

    Interestingly, no signs, symptoms, aches or pains, and if it hadnít been for work sending me on these assessments, Iíd have never known, and would have probably carried on drinking as normal.

    Maybe mine is a cautionary tale if you are up at the 30-40 units a week, but think all is OK.
    I'd give it up completely. It's easy after the first couple of weeks in my experience. I did just that about 7.5 years ago & didn't miss it one bit. Recently I ended my period of abstinence after a life changing experience but plan on giving up again soon

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schofie View Post
    No offence intended but it sounds like you might be an alcoholic
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave O'Sullivan View Post
    He sounds to me like a man being very open about his consumption and realising it needs addressing. I'd leave it there personally.
    No offence taken at all, and quite possibly I could agree with you, and maybe my Ďquite possiblyí is denial, who knows.

    It is habit rather than need, when the habit is broken, I neither miss or require it. Just a habit I fell into.

    Iím consuming far less than I did when I despised a job that affected me mentally and physically, which resulted in far more concerning mental health challenges, but am happily through that now.

    I quit smoking, have my weight now back in check (ish), and seek to not find happiness from buying an ever increasing number of watches I can afford but donít need - trinkets are no longer my view on success.

    Dave, thank you for your support; helps to make me feel that whilst not through it all, that there are people that can appreciate some people might naturally drink more than others & that they realise it isnít the perfect way.

    M

  23. #23
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    My brother in law has been diagnosed with fatty liver. He doesn't drink much, eats pretty well and is fairly active. Still waiting more info on that.

    I don't drink much but probably could do with less, has been a drink or two most nights lately. Think I'll join those packing it in for a bit!

  24. #24
    similar story for me and about the same age. I cut out beer, bread and shit morning cereals. Lost about stone and a half. Still drink as much as before (wine) but replaced beer with gin and slimline or whiskey. Liver is back to normal after 12 months

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mj2k View Post
    No offence taken at all, and quite possibly I could agree with you, and maybe my ‘quite possibly’ is denial, who knows.


    I grew up around some pretty serious alcohol problems that affected one of the most beautiful people I've ever had the pleasure of knowing. He was my Mum's partner through my early and mid teens and was a key influence on my life in many ways. They broke up because of his drinking and the void he left behind was painful. I wish someone had had a frank talk with him, or maybe they did and he didn't listen, I don't know. What I do know is that because of his drinking and also smoking he ended up with throat cancer and a tube in his throat. It got blocked one night and he died alone on his lawn, presumably trying to get help. I'm welling up just writing this, and how he died has always been a centrepiece in my consciousness as a marker of what can happen when people succumb to addictions. I also miss him.

    If you don't have your health it is very difficult to enjoy life's rich tapestry. Please look after yourself, you're only here once and your body is a miracle in itself. It deserves love and to be treated well so that it serves you for years to come
    Last edited by Schofie; 12th January 2018 at 23:02.

  26. #26
    Sadly, this is starting to be a Specialist subject...... and it is much more complicated than just alcohol, diabetes, obesity or any other individual condition.

    I started with NAFLD, developed Liver Cancer and spent the recent Christmas in hospital with a severe, related, bleed.

    Happy to chat offline, but I have learnt a lot about what does complicate this condition and the medical inter relationships between Gastro, Liver and Diabetic.

    My immediate advice is not to focus on any one aspect but to understand what is really affecting you.... and for goodness sake, donít ignore or become complacent. 24 hours in December was the difference between life and.........

    Jon

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schofie View Post


    I grew up around some pretty serious alcohol problems that affected one of the most beautiful people I've ever had the pleasure of knowing. He was my Mum's partner through my early and mid teens and was a key influence on my life in many ways. I wish someone had had a frank talk with him, or maybe they did and he didn't listen, I don't know. What I do know is that because of his drinking and also smoking he ended up with throat cancer and a tube in his throat. It got blocked one night and he died on his lawn, presumably trying to get help. I'm welling up just writing this.

    If you don't have your health it is very difficult to enjoy life's rich tapestry. Please look after yourself, you're only here once
    You have a pm


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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mj2k View Post
    No offence taken at all, and quite possibly I could agree with you, and maybe my ‘quite possibly’ is denial, who knows.

    It is habit rather than need, when the habit is broken, I neither miss or require it. Just a habit I fell into.

    I’m consuming far less than I did when I despised a job that affected me mentally and physically, which resulted in far more concerning mental health challenges, but am happily through that now.

    I quit smoking, have my weight now back in check (ish), and seek to not find happiness from buying an ever increasing number of watches I can afford but don’t need - trinkets are no longer my view on success.

    Dave, thank you for your support; helps to make me feel that whilst not through it all, that there are people that can appreciate some people might naturally drink more than others & that they realise it isn’t the perfect way.

    M
    I recognise the behaviours and mindset created by the job you describe, experienced similar.

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by b11ocx View Post
    Sadly, this is starting to be a Specialist subject...... and it is much more complicated than just alcohol, diabetes, obesity or any other individual condition.

    I started with NAFLD, developed Liver Cancer and spent the recent Christmas in hospital with a severe, related, bleed.

    Happy to chat offline, but I have learnt a lot about what does complicate this condition and the medical inter relationships between Gastro, Liver and Diabetic.

    My immediate advice is not to focus on any one aspect but to understand what is really affecting you.... and for goodness sake, donít ignore or become complacent. 24 hours in December was the difference between life and.........

    Jon
    Really sorry to hear that Jon. It sounds like youíve had a really tough time. I had the big C eleven years ago so can empathise with your situation. Stay strong.

  30. #30
    Master Kirk280's Avatar
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    Some remarkably honest, brave and moving posts here Gents. Fair play to you all.

    The fact that Iíve just poured another whisky is an irony not lost on me.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk280 View Post
    Some remarkably honest, brave and moving posts here Gents. Fair play to you all.

    The fact that I’ve just poured another whisky is an irony not lost on me.
    Cheers, I'm in the same boat except my tipple is a gran reserva. Salud.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schofie View Post

    If you don't have your health it is very difficult to enjoy life's rich tapestry. Please look after yourself, you're only here once and your body is a miracle in itself. It deserves love and to be treated well so that it serves you for years to come
    Never a truer word said!


    Hope I didn't come across as too sniffy earlier and I'm sorry to hear of your experience.
    The trouble with 'that' word is it brings a whole host of other complications. A person must decide for themselves whether or not it applies to them, not be told that it does, (or in fairness to you, might).

  33. #33
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    Alcohol is an addictive drug. It is no surprise therefore to find many people after years of use, addicted to alcohol. Labels like alcoholic aren't helpful in my opinion because they carry some element of moral judgement on a person, who is a normal person who just happens to be addicted to the most commonly used addictive drug there is.
    My advice to the OP would be, yes certainly try and cut back if you can. However if you are consistently drinking more than a safe target you set for yourself just give the stuff up. When you take a drug out of your life you win every time.

  34. #34
    Grand Master Velorum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noTAGlove View Post
    How did you know yours was enlarged/fatty?
    My GP told me after running tests.

    His first concern was for my Pancreas due to frequent flare ups. The liver came next.

    Accepting the fact that I was a functional alcoholic changed my life and I wish that it had happened many years before.
    Last edited by Velorum; 13th January 2018 at 08:15.

  35. #35
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    OP, my relationship with alcohol is very similar to yours. Iíve enjoyed drinking from an early age and now, entering my late forties, find myself only drinking at the weekend, a couple of bottles of wine or maybe 8-10 beers, happy in the knowledge that thereís no work tomorrow. However, as Iíve gotten older, the amount of time it takes to come round the next day has increased dramatically. These days, especially the morning after, I wonder why I drink at all. Iíve got 2 lovely young kids who must think Iím grumpy at times. Not a problem this morning though, I havenít had a drop since last weekend and Iím up and about, fresh as a daisy, spending time with my lad and I feel good about that. I am thinking that, as l get older, drink is reducing my enjoyment of life rather than increasing it.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by noTAGlove View Post
    Actually, having done a bit of research on the tíintersphere, it is not unusual to be able to palpate the liver.

    When lying down and taking a big deep breath apparently this drops the edge of the liver down from the protective rib cage so the doctor can feel it.

    This is what the doctor did to me, but she obviously felt it was larger than normal.

    Not sure anyone needed that information!!
    With a BMI of 26, you're pretty slim, and feeling the liver edge on deep palpation is not abnormal. Don't panic about your physical health. Wait for the enzymes, they'll tell the truth and indicate whether your level of alcohol intact is damaging your liver.

    Whilst this type of private health check can be useful, more often it is performed by "doctors of a certain type". Her off hand comment on her finding is somewhat inappropriate. Screening scans performed for no reason are also worrying, as they often show up incidental findings that are irrelevant, but cause a lot of unnecessary worry, further tests and treatment.

    In general it's best to see your GP every so often if you're health conscious, and have your blood pressure, sugar, cholesterol and prostate checked .

    On the alcohol front, increased intake in middle age is linked with a multitude of other psychosocial factors. It's almost a sign the applecart tipping. If life in general is good, there's usually no time, place or desire for drinking too much.

    The guys on here who have changed their own habits will have a lot more insight and advice for anyone who needs help to change.

    Post not directed at anyone in particular. Putting your hand up is the first step.

  37. #37
    Craftsman davida's Avatar
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    This book is really worth a few hours of your time if you're thinking of giving up https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/..._Stop_Drinking

    Im not saying its the holy grail, but although repetitive, it does get the point across.

  38. #38

    Enlarged Liver

    Quote Originally Posted by Integrale View Post
    With a BMI of 26, you're pretty slim, and feeling the liver edge on deep palpation is not abnormal. Don't panic about your physical health. Wait for the enzymes, they'll tell the truth and indicate whether your level of alcohol intact is damaging your liver.

    Whilst this type of private health check can be useful, more often it is performed by "doctors of a certain type". Her off hand comment on her finding is somewhat inappropriate. Screening scans performed for no reason are also worrying, as they often show up incidental findings that are irrelevant, but cause a lot of unnecessary worry, further tests and treatment.

    In general it's best to see your GP every so often if you're health conscious, and have your blood pressure, sugar, cholesterol and prostate checked .

    On the alcohol front, increased intake in middle age is linked with a multitude of other psychosocial factors. It's almost a sign the applecart tipping. If life in general is good, there's usually no time, place or desire for drinking too much.

    The guys on here who have changed their own habits will have a lot more insight and advice for anyone who needs help to change.

    Post not directed at anyone in particular. Putting your hand up is the first step.
    Thanks for that. It puts myself more at ease with the medical stuff.

    As for the psychosocial factors, that had crossed my mind. I think it may be related to the children becoming teenagers, and there diminishing dependence on me (which I struggle with), so I have a lot more free time. Also because my social life in my mid to late 40s is a lot quieter than it used to be.

    But, generally life is good, and I like work (as much as you can at 49) and have a loving marriage and a family.

    I think I need a time consuming hobby!
    Last edited by noTAGlove; 13th January 2018 at 11:16.

  39. #39
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    Itís heartening to see the honesty and camaraderie in this thread, this is the side of the forum I like. Iím glad you are addressing your issue. I found out recently about mildly high blood pressure in a similar way, would have been oblivious otherwise.

    On a related topic, does anyone have recommendations for a one-off / biennial private health check (provider and type) for a middle-aged lady? My wife wants one, but itís not an option on my work private health cover (with Cigna) and she doesnít have the option with her public employer. Maybe Vitality (along with the related benefit package)? Thanks folks.


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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by stefaulkner View Post
    OP, my relationship with alcohol is very similar to yours. Iíve enjoyed drinking from an early age and now, entering my late forties, find myself only drinking at the weekend, a couple of bottles of wine or maybe 8-10 beers, happy in the knowledge that thereís no work tomorrow. However, as Iíve gotten older, the amount of time it takes to come round the next day has increased dramatically. These days, especially the morning after, I wonder why I drink at all. Iíve got 2 lovely young kids who must think Iím grumpy at times. Not a problem this morning though, I havenít had a drop since last weekend and Iím up and about, fresh as a daisy, spending time with my lad and I feel good about that. I am thinking that, as l get older, drink is reducing my enjoyment of life rather than increasing it.
    I think when it stops being an enhancement then it's definitely time for a rethink.

  41. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by jukeboxs View Post
    On a related topic, does anyone have recommendations for a one-off / biennial private health check (provider and type) for a middle-aged lady? My wife wants one, but itís not an option on my work private health cover (with Cigna) and she doesnít have the option with her public employer. Maybe Vitality (along with the related benefit package)? Thanks folks.
    I believe BUPA will do an assessment for a fee. From my work benefits statement my two hour consultation (one hour doctor) and battery of test was around £350, although I have general BUPA cover through work so maybe that provides as discount.

    Although, my take is that the your GP and the NHS are equally as good for key tests, e.g. cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, cervical (for your wife).

    I found the biggest benefit for me (apart from the alcohol kick up the arse!) is the trending of results, as when you have them every 3 years, you get a good trend of subtle bodily/functional changes like waistline, weight, cholesterol, blood pressure which was very useful for me. But no reason this canít be done through your GP.

    The consultation does go a bit deeper, but I find that is more related to peripheral tesing I personally didnít need. The 15 mins of musco-skeletal test where a waste of time, although the prostate examination was useful (and the test not uncomfortable), but being relatively young and having no symptoms not convinced it was absolutely necessary.

    I would say try to get what you need from your GP, and pay for this if that doesnít satisfy.

  42. #42
    Craftsman
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    I’m no expert but if you can consume a bottle of wine with no ill effects I would be concerned that the body is getting too used to alcohol.
    A friend of mine used to be an alcoholic but hasn’t touched a drop in the last 20 years, even though he got married.

  43. #43
    Journeyman
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    Sounds like a man of great resolve!

  44. #44
    Grand Master Neil.C's Avatar
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    Lots of threads on here about different beers, spirits, wines etc that are always well populated but I can never join in them anymore.

    Found I had a borderline fatty liver during a health MOT four years or so ago so gave up there and then.

    Difficult at first to break the habit of a drink or three in the evening but after a week the spell was broken.

    Had a couple of glasses of Champagne at Christmas but was careful to leave it at that.

    TBH I don't feel any healthier now than I did then but health must come first.
    Cheers,
    Neil.

    My Speedmaster website:

    http://www.freewebs.com/neil271052

  45. #45
    Iíve not drunk alcohol for 15 years.

    Donít believe people who say ďitís always with youĒ. No itís not. Iíve had only one or two Ďdifficultí moments in my very early days of abstinence. One was at a wedding (where letís face it everybody seems to spend the entire day necking the stuff) and the other was a wonderful, lazy Sunday afternoon sprawled out on the lawn of a French chateau after a civic reception, with baskets of fresh bread, cheese etc and lovely red wine on tap.

    Today, weddings, New Yearís Eve, etc, no problem at all, I donít even think about it. Itís not always with you, youíre not always fighting it.

    Only two people have ever Ďgot funnyí about me not drinking, when I was in a social group. Both clearly had serious drink problems themselves.

    I found controlling amounts much harder than giving up. Thereís almost no aspect of your life that isnít enhanced.

    There is one downside. Youíre always expected to drive! While I agree it seems sensible, I want to be driven sometimes! Why do I always have to find the parking space in a strange location? Iíll take my turn like everyone else, I just donít want to have to do it every time!

  46. #46
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    ^ They say itís always with you because as you said controlling amounts is almost impossible, which is why you need to be tee total. If it didnít stay with you, youíd be fine having a glass or two every now and then.
    And as to driving, make sure the deal is that you drive on the way back but someone must be sober enough to drive you to the party. Thus they get to park the car in unknown places
    Well, everybody in Casablanca has problems. Yours may work out.

  47. #47
    Master
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    Good on you!!

    Must admit I have a strange allergy so have never had this problem!! Always used to get burining hot when I drank but assumed it was a bit of stress from crowded places(like my own personal space) but after quite a few years I looked in the mirror and my face was swollen like wearing padded glasses?!?!!
    Went to the doctor and he said your body is rejecting it as itís a poison which was good?!?!????!!! After some tests turns out heís right, doesnít stop me drinking just not very often, maybe once a month and never enough to get drunk!!!
    My best friend on the other hand had been an alcoholic all our lives which if he hadnít been killed/murdered by one of our friends the drinking would have killed him!!!
    It wa drinking that lead to his divorce and then lead to him living with the guy that killed him so it was still the drink that killed him, he left 3 daughters behind!!!!!
    I think all these things have lead to myself and my wife drinking very little, still have a huge cupboard of alcohol for anyone that wants a drink as Iím not a party pooper and if it wasnít for my allergy Iíd probably drink a little more!!

    Anyway I hope you have reversed the problems on the liver!

    Chris

  48. #48
    ^ It can be a daunting or straightforward decision to stop drinking. If you believe that every single day for the rest of your life will be like the first three days, restless, irritable, etc, than surely that decision is harder? But it isn't like that. You don't fight it everyday. It goes from your mind.

  49. #49
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil.C View Post
    Lots of threads on here about different beers, spirits, wines etc that are always well populated but I can never join in them anymore.

    Found I had a borderline fatty liver during a health MOT four years or so ago so gave up there and then.

    Difficult at first to break the habit of a drink or three in the evening but after a week the spell was broken.

    Had a couple of glasses of Champagne at Christmas but was careful to leave it at that.

    TBH I don't feel any healthier now than I did then but health must come first.
    If I can ask, did you find at subsequent health MOTs that the borderline fatty liver had improved?

  50. #50
    Grand Master Daddelvirks's Avatar
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    For the last 25 years or so I've been drinking about half a bottle of red every night.
    I'm enjoying it usually in front of the telly, late at night watching something or other on the BBC.

    Every now and then with my friends in the pub, when it's a "good" night, a pint of four/five of Guiness is consumed.

    Not drinking at all is probably best, but after doing some research myself, I've discovered that genes, eating healthy and exercize etc are important facts as well. I'm a healthy eater and get plenty of exercise, don't know about the quality of my liver though :)

    What I also discovered was that over the seventies and eighties when the French were still drinking massive amounts of wine, they didn't have more liver disease related to alcohol problems than other countries.

    So, my guess is that an overal healthy lifestyle combined with moderate alcohol use shouldn't be a problem. (well I keep telling myself that anyway :)
    Got a new watch, divers watch it is, had to drown the bastard to get it!

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