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Thread: Best way to shoot a collection?

  1. #1
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    Best way to shoot a collection?

    I have a Nikon D40X but I am no expert and would like to take some good clear shots of my collection.
    I am a complete novice and if I take a good picture it's usually by accident or trial and a lot of error.
    Can anybody suggest how the camera settings should be.
    The camera came with an 18-55mm lens - whatever that means.

  2. #2
    A collection of what?

  3. #3
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    watches

  4. #4
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    anybody any experience?

  5. #5
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    I guess it depends on what you might wish to do with the images, I'd use the DLSR if I wanted to keep/edit pics of my collection but have recently found my iPad gives excellent images and can be shared on here by using the TZUK app. With regard to using the DSLR it's mainly about lighting, using the appropriate white balance settings and keeping the camera still when pressing the shutter. Cheers, John B4

  6. #6
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    Thanks John, my deficiences came to light(pardon the pun) when trying to take an image of my collection, I was holding the camera by hand and yes the images were not focused enough, so that could be shaking.
    The collection would be on the desk about 18-24inches away from the camera under 'daylight' bulbs. Should I really be doing this with natural light.
    What settings should I be using on the camera?
    Should I be using a tripod?

    I see pictures on here that seem to have been taken by some iphone or ipad and they look great, are those devices really that good, able to elliminate shake, correct the lighting, sort out the white balance etc. where a DSLR has to be setup properly, use a tripod, use daylight etc.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by K300 View Post
    anybody any experience?
    Iím no expert but here is a few things to try.

    1. Buy a small tripod, table top sort.
    2. Set up near a well light window.
    3. Use the aperture mode on your camera. Sorry I donít know what the minimum is on your lens but think of it as the smaller the number the less is in focus but the more light is needed (I think?) take a photo with the smallest, focused on one point, then try a larger number, youíll see the shutter speed slows down but youíll get more in focus.

    If you use ďaperture priority modeĒ you set the depth of field and the camera works the rest out.

    With good light, a tripod and the right setting even a cheap camera and lens will take a good picture.

    Let me know how you get on.

  8. #8
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    thanks Justin, I'll give it a go tomorrow, the proof will be in the pudding... or the pics

  9. #9
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    Hi K300, a couple of pics just taken with iPad, just natural light from window, again main issue for clarity is keeping camera still. You will get 'larger' results from DSLR meaning cropping is easier but for sending on web low file sizes are better. Hope this helpsCheers, JohnB4


    Sent from my iPad using TZ-UK mobile app

  10. #10
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    Thanks chaps, managed to get some space in the conservatory(previously used as a dumping ground for old furniture) so that gives me all the light I need(although it's beginning to fade), now just need to setup a lowish table to get an 'aerial' shot and the camera.

  11. #11
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    Here we are chaps, taken with the camera on a tripod and using manual focus, forgetting the glare for a moment.

    Most of this image is out of focus, however when enlarged in photoshop I can see that the the signature on the clasp on the black Swiss Army on the left is crisp and clear as well as the microfibre close to the box, the Rolex bracelet close to the box and the central Eco Drive on the top row.
    Would that suggest it's a depth of field issue, not that I fully understand how to play with this. Any suggestions.
    If you want to see the full size image so you can see the different areas of focus it's here, http://jpgif.co.uk/images/temporary/DSC_0001.jpg but it's pretty big.

    Thanks again chaps.

  12. #12
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    Here's another:
    Taken with the function dial on 'A' and using the adjuster set to 50.
    The image is a lot better with more in focus, but the image has gone really dark, I've adjusted the brightness in photoshop so you can at least see the image properly.

    The original image is here:
    http://jpgif.co.uk/images/temporary/02-Ap-050.jpg

  13. #13
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    I'd suggest that the depth of field is too shallow ( due to large aperture. Check you've got aperture priority set on the mode dial and try a smaller aperture- try f8 for starters. It'll mean a slower shutter speed but that won't be a problem if you're using a tripod.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by CriticalMass View Post
    I'd suggest that the depth of field is too shallow ( due to large aperture. Check you've got aperture priority set on the mode dial and try a smaller aperture- try f8 for starters. It'll mean a slower shutter speed but that won't be a problem if you're using a tripod.
    That is good advice,

    Nice collection K300 and good shots in my opinion.

  15. #15
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    thanks chaps I'll try again this weekend

  16. #16
    Journeyman risingsun's Avatar
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    I would look at the angles of the watch faces as some are showing/beaming reflections of the faces which loses some details of the watch. If using a tripod perhaps use a longer shutter speed in darker conditions with no reflections.


    Sent from my iPhone using TZ-UK mobile app

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