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Thread: Solid tyres..

  1. #1

    Solid tyres..

    Was reading some different reviews on these (700c) and was wondering if anyone here uses them. Is it necessary to buy the £100 set? or a less costly pair from eBay would do? Are they easy to fit? or require a lot of skill and a workshop?

  2. #2
    Master Brian's Avatar
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    I tried one on a back wheel this year - Ball ache to fit unless you have a tool and a mate.

    I will wait for a year or two before trying another - I do dry trails and road mainly.

    On a hot day it was ok until the tyre got ride hot then it seemed very heavy.

    Im a big fat git and use 32 or 35 but this was a 32 from memory. Tann or green or something like that

    Manhole covers or white lines not wet, damp or even first thing in the morning were a definite no no - nearly went A over T a couple of times on a very very slight turn - glad I didn't try the front wheel.

    Back to my Conti sport contacts................... for years these have been tyre of choice for me.

    As for ebay cheapies I have never seen them - is it for a commuter ?

    My london bike always has Marathon 32's


    B
    Last edited by Brian; 12th August 2017 at 12:46.

  3. #3
    Here....

    lot of glass etc on the roads and paths , get fed up with punctures
    ��
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/700x23C-Bi....c100290.m3507
    Last edited by sestrel; 12th August 2017 at 18:00.

  4. #4
    Master seffrican's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sestrel View Post
    Was reading some different reviews on these (700c) and was wondering if anyone here uses them. Is it necessary to buy the £100 set? or a less costly pair from eBay would do? Are they easy to fit? or require a lot of skill and a workshop?
    Bicycles had solid tyres before Mr Dunlop invented the pneumatic tyre. There's a reason that solid tyres are now routinely only found on kiddie tricycles.

  5. #5
    Err, cos kiddies hate punctures too?

  6. #6
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    I though there was tyres full of some sort of micro bubbled foam, that fill like solid tyre but behave a little more like inflated.
    Well, everybody in Casablanca has problems. Yours may work out.

  7. #7
    These ?

    http://tannus.co.uk/ctg_1101134549.html


    my tyres are recommended to run at 80psi, so 110 seems bloody hard...

  8. #8
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Yes. Probably quite hard but better than full rubber.
    Well, everybody in Casablanca has problems. Yours may work out.

  9. #9
    Master seffrican's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sestrel View Post
    Err, cos kiddies hate punctures too?
    Then the kiddies should use Kevlar belted tyres, keep them inflated to the max rated pressure, and learn to spot glass on the road.

    That way they get to have a lighter, faster bike with a smoother ride, better handling, and much safer levels of traction than the other kiddies who bought into the solid tyre hype.

  10. #10
    And have you tried GreenTyre or Tannus?

    Have had a few wrecked Scwalbe and Armadillo tyres. Very few areas locally that aren't covered in glass, nails, every sharp thing you can think of. Not fun trying to fix a tyre on a tiny mountain road in the pissing rain, with no lay-bys or space for miles.
    Would actually like to hear from someone who has actually tried them..
    Last edited by sestrel; 13th August 2017 at 10:04.

  11. #11
    Grand Master
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    Interesting thread. Thanks OP.

    Flats are driving me and my son to despair too.
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  12. #12
    Master Brian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sestrel View Post
    And have you tried GreenTyre or Tannus?

    Have had a few wrecked Scwalbe and Armadillo tyres. Very few areas locally that aren't covered in glass, nails, every sharp thing you can think of. Not fun trying to fix a tyre on a tiny mountain road in the pissing rain, with no lay-bys or space for miles.
    Would actually like to hear from someone who has actually tried them..
    That's it Tannus - my mate has the tyre(and rim now) - spoke to him yesterday and asked him what he thought.

    He's back on his normals - I don't think that it is necessarily a valid comment from him though since the tyre was a "given" to try.

    I don't think that I would spend 50 (if that's the price) the new supreme may be worth a look for that money.

    B

  13. #13
    Grand Master Glamdring's Avatar
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    I thought the thread was about mobility scooters so I had nothing to say. Seems I was right.

  14. #14
    Master seffrican's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huertecilla View Post
    Interesting thread. Thanks OP.

    Flats are driving me and my son to despair too.
    It's a lot easier to fix a flat than to repair a disintegrated Greentyre when far from home.

    The subject of solid tyres comes up every few months on cycling forums. There's always someone who decides to give them a go. Then the horror stories start.

    Sundials are far easier to maintain than mechanical wristwatches, because they are far lower tech. There's a reason no one wears sundials on their wrist though.

  15. #15
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by seffrican View Post
    It's a lot easier to fix a flat than to repair a disintegrated Greentyre when far from home.

    The subject of solid tyres comes up every few months on cycling forums. There's always someone who decides to give them a go. Then the horror stories start.

    Sundials are far easier to maintain than mechanical wristwatches, because they are far lower tech. There's a reason no one wears sundials on their wrist though.
    In offroad motorcycles the “solids“ have won themselves a large following. Far from low tech btw. Way more high tech stuff than inner tubes.

    The point about on route fixes applies to tubeless too to some extend yet in MTB they have soundly won the argument.

    For the moment we have Conti Gatorskin with tubes but have an open mind and since the tires wear out soon enough, the choice presents itself regularly.
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  16. #16
    IMO WHY hasn't some industrial designer/inventor tested SOLID RUBBER tyres using every ShoreA hardness from SOFT to HARDISH etc.

  17. #17
    Master seffrican's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huertecilla View Post
    In offroad motorcycles the “solids“ have won themselves a large following.
    Motorcycles all have suspension, and their ratio of sprung to unsprung weight is far higher than for fully suspended bicycles.

  18. #18
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by seffrican View Post
    Motorcycles all have suspension, and their ratio of sprung to unsprung weight is far higher than for fully suspended bicycles.
    The Tannus 700x23 is supposed to weigh in at 380 gr.
    The Gatorskins with inner tubes are 370.

    The biggy for me at the moment is that the grip the Continental rubber offers is veryVERY good and confidence inspiring. I would rather have a mousse insert but no such luck for 700s.


    P.s. the Greentyre 700x28 are quoted as 540 gr. and yes THAT is simply a NoNo in the mountains.
    Last edited by Huertecilla; 13th August 2017 at 12:07.
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  19. #19
    Tubeless with latex inside. Will not be as puncture proof as solids but the ride quality and grip will be far superior.
    Let's face it solid and thick carcassed tyres with lots of puncture protection do not ride well. Fine perhaps for a commuter but not for recreational road riding where grip and ride quality make the ride more enjoyable.

  20. #20
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    Tubeless with latex inside. Will not be as puncture proof as solids but the ride quality and grip will be far superior.
    Let's face it solid and thick carcassed tyres with lots of puncture protection do not ride well. Fine perhaps for a commuter but not for recreational road riding where grip and ride quality make the ride more enjoyable.
    Well, yes, with the snag that tubeless is not so easy to repair (inflate) when you do get a puncture.

    Also some puncture protected tires are pretty good, like the Conti Gatorskin.

    Lastly solids are developing rapidly and the ride qualty of the latest crop is pretty much on par with 20 to 23 tires. The Tannus tires are used quite a lot over here and I can imagine that the next generations are just down the road.

    Meanwhile I am fitting a bit sturdier inner tire when the current one blows. Pinch flats are our main challenge. As such I have the 28s “over“inflated at the cost of ride comfort, meaning that I am keeping solids into view.
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  21. #21
    Grand Master
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    Oh man...

    We did a climb route this morning.
    Stuff solids! till they get LIGHT!! I want helium filled tubeless, heck, a helium filled frame and lighweight EVERYTHING and shed 10 kilos myself even if that makes me look anorexic if I am to do this sort of routes more often.
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  22. #22
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    Lightbulb Real experts


    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  23. #23
    Well, if those guys can get on and win with Them..

    Couldnt afford to change my rims to fit them though..

  24. #24
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by sestrel View Post

    Couldnt afford to change my rims to fit them though..
    They fit on just about any rim.
    Order two shipping free.
    About half an hour each wheel and you can leave the repair crap at home, forget about checking tire pressure.
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  25. #25
    Grand Master
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    Just read that the Specialized Alibi bikes come standard on Tannus rubber.
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  26. #26
    https://totalfitnessbath.co.uk/speci...rt-2017/?imt=1

    Nimbus Airless here, not heard of them.

  27. #27
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by sestrel View Post
    https://totalfitnessbath.co.uk/speci...rt-2017/?imt=1

    Nimbus Airless here, not heard of them.
    Nimbus is Tannus made for Specialized; EXACTLY the same, just with a different brand molded on and a different tread profile.
    The Nimbus comes in the hardness specced by Specialized which is either Tannus hard or regular. Most likely it is regular for max. comfort.
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  28. #28
    Grand Master
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    There is another option; inflatable mousse: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Road-Bike-....c100005.m1851

    Quite cheap too.
    At that price it seems worth a try even though the material used is literally make or break. Your neck too.

    The production cost of moulded mousse however cannot be high and the Tannus prices seem to be taking the Mickey because they have a unique selling point. I mean; a good quality inner tube costs more to produce and comes in at say 5 Euros.
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  29. #29
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by sestrel View Post
    https://totalfitnessbath.co.uk/speci...rt-2017/?imt=1

    Nimbus Airless here, not heard of them.
    btw Specialized are 49% owned by Merida, Taiwan who in their turn subcontract most of the/their frames and about all of their carbon to Giant.
    The tire trick is a mere slight of hand to them ;-)
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  30. #30
    Certainly cheap enough. Appaling 'chinglish' always makes me think twice though.
    If I was going to sell my product in another country, I would ask someone from that country to read it through so it made sense. Not rocket science.

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