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Thread: Printing help

  1. #1
    Grand Master seikopath's Avatar
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    Printing help

    I need to print out an image that will never fade.
    It will be exposed to light, but it is indoors. There is the possibility of it recieving some direct sunlight, but only for very short periods.
    What's the best method of printing a digital image for permanence /colour fastness?
    Thanks
    Dave

  2. #2
    Master AM94's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seikopath View Post
    I need to print out an image that will never fade.
    It will be exposed to light, but it is indoors. There is the possibility of it recieving some direct sunlight, but only for very short periods.
    What's the best method of printing a digital image for permanence /colour fastness?
    Thanks
    Dave
    Dave, are you not able (don't want to put) UVA/UVB protection glass in front of the image? I have some vintage posters and that is what I've used.

    I am not hands-on with print any longer but unless there as been a leap forward, no ink is permanent or colour fast when subject to sunlight, even for short periods of time.

  3. #3
    I've got an Epson 9890 here in the factory which uses K3 inks, I'm sure they are guaranteed for something like a century!

    I've also got a Roland VG640 which uses the new TrueVis ink technology which withstands UV for a minimum of 3 years OUTDOORS without lamination so would stand the test of time indoors I'm sure.

    It all depends on what application you need it for.

  4. #4
    Grand Master seikopath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AM94 View Post
    Dave, are you not able (don't want to put) UVA/UVB protection glass in front of the image? I have some vintage posters and that is what I've used.

    I am not hands-on with print any longer but unless there as been a leap forward, no ink is permanent or colour fast when subject to sunlight, even for short periods of time.
    it will be set behind a carved piece of rock crystal

    its only a very small image

    i realise nothing lasts forever, i just want it to last as long as possible
    Last edited by seikopath; 17th July 2017 at 16:26.

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    Grand Master seikopath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gilford View Post
    I've got an Epson 9890 here in the factory which uses K3 inks, I'm sure they are guaranteed for something like a century!

    I've also got a Roland VG640 which uses the new TrueVis ink technology which withstands UV for a minimum of 3 years OUTDOORS without lamination so would stand the test of time indoors I'm sure.

    It all depends on what application you need it for.
    which do you think is the better option marcus?

  6. #6
    Epson K3, we use our machine for fine art prints for galleries etc, no complaints yet!

    Nobody really knows how long these things will last, but I would imagine Epson do vigorous testing to state such claims, either way it will still be around a long time after you and I!

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    Master AM94's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seikopath View Post
    i realise nothing lasts forever, i just want it to last as long as possible
    Understood.

    It sounds like Gilford has his finger firmly on the pulse of what can be achieved with modern, commercial-grade, digital printing

    All of my ideas were based around preservation glass / UV filtering plexiglass; as you are looking to place it behind rock crystal, my idea is void. :)

  8. #8
    Don't forget the paper stock and mounting, that needs to be acid free/museum grade.

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    Grand Master seikopath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    Don't forget the paper stock and mounting, that needs to be acid free/museum grade.
    Cheers, I have got the word 'archival' going round my head, I guess that is something to do with it

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