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Thread: New to Macro

  1. #1
    Master
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    New to Macro

    Hi. I've always had an interest in macro, but never really tried it. Just did a deal with a forum member (thanks, James!) to acquire a macro lens and I'm amazed at just how shallow DOF can be.

    Picture 1 is taken focussing on the dial of the watch





    and picture 2 taken from just about the same position is focussed on the bezel




    Obviously hand held, and not what i would call good shots in any way but they do illustrate the type of problem I will be having when I get round to plants and bugs....

    Rob

  2. #2
    Welcome to the world of frustration, aka macro photography. ;-)

    For hand-held that's not so bad at all.

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  3. #3
    Master TimeOut's Avatar
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    I can relate to the macro frustration comments and also fascinated to hear some tips.

    I'm no photographer but my preferred approach with that very lens became hand held, just fast enough exposure to get a sharp shot handheld using the OIS on number 2, manual focus and then play with the appature until the DOF was acceptable.

    This was outside, handheld, 400 ASA, F9 I think and 1/60.



    This other thing I did was low light indoors and 3 second exposures - very small appature on a tri pod - all the DOF you ever need.

  4. #4
    Grand Master
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    You can do macro on the cheap http://forum.tz-uk.com/showthread.ph...ighlight=Macro The subject has also been discussed re lenses, focussing rigs etc, which a quick search will reveal.

  5. #5
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by magirus View Post
    You can do macro on the cheap http://forum.tz-uk.com/showthread.ph...ighlight=Macro The subject has also been discussed re lenses, focussing rigs etc, which a quick search will reveal.
    Thanks for that, but I don't have an iphone - have an elderly Galaxy 3 which does everything I need so it would mean either getting a new phone or a new lens. I rather think that I would get more value out of the lens than I would from an Apple iphone.

    Rob

  6. #6
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barryboy View Post
    Thanks for that, but I don't have an iphone - have an elderly Galaxy 3 which does everything I need so it would mean either getting a new phone or a new lens. I rather think that I would get more value out of the lens than I would from an Apple iphone.

    Rob
    If you take a look online you can buy a set of those lenses for approx 2.50 to fit on almost any mobile phone, just for a bit of fun you understand, and not to replace true macro photography. I wasn't suggesting that you should buy an iPhone. A tripod and some means of incremental focussing are essential for decent macro results. The discussions we've had about macro were in this vein....

    http://forum.tz-uk.com/showthread.ph...ighlight=macro
    http://forum.tz-uk.com/showthread.ph...ighlight=macro
    http://forum.tz-uk.com/showthread.ph...ighlight=macro

    This is the place for macro photography, not to be confused with close-up photography http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/
    Like watches it's all about having fun and learning.

  7. #7
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by magirus View Post
    If you take a look online you can buy a set of those lenses for approx 2.50 to fit on almost any mobile phone, just for a bit of fun you understand, and not to replace true macro photography. I wasn't suggesting that you should buy an iPhone. A tripod and some means of incremental focussing are essential for decent macro results. The discussions we've had about macro were in this vein....

    http://forum.tz-uk.com/showthread.ph...ighlight=macro
    http://forum.tz-uk.com/showthread.ph...ighlight=macro
    http://forum.tz-uk.com/showthread.ph...ighlight=macro

    This is the place for macro photography, not to be confused with close-up photography http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/
    Like watches it's all about having fun and learning.

  8. #8
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    Ah.... See what you mean. It's a long thread and I'll plough through it tomorrow. I'm bound to learn something.

    Rob

  9. #9
    Craftsman
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    My hand-held macro effort.


  10. #10
    Craftsman
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    Also hand-held. This time shot through double-glazing i.e. from inside the house.


  11. #11
    Apprentice
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    For anyone with a DSLR camera that wants to experiment with macro photography, macro rings are a great option. They're essentially a set of three spacer rings that go between the lens and the body and convert your lens into a macro.

    Dirt cheap and support autofocus if you get the right ones. I bought mine on ebay for about 25.

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